Celent Says

If You Build It, Will They Come?

Mike Fitzgerald
Insurance Experts' Forum, July 20, 2010

What is the link between improving service technology and improving sales incentives? This was the topic of a very insightful conversation that I recently had with an insurance CIO. It highlighted how interrelated the processes are in the insurance value chain. Investments can be made in one area, but if other, correlated areas do not receive attention, the benefits from the initial investment may be less than expected.

The two areas in question are policy administration and distribution management. This company has determined that the key to properly managing their profitability is the ability to change their mix of business in order to respond to market conditions. This strategic imperative led to a recent investment in best-in-class rating technology to increase the responsiveness of product updates, and the speed of new product introductions. The company also upgraded their BI and analytic capabilities, allowing their actuaries to develop new discounting and pricing methods.

The CIO shared that they were pleased with the resulting cycle time reductions and productivity increases. However, he reports that they only got the full benefits they sought after they updated their compensation system. They needed to be able to change incentives in line with product modifications in order to effectively modify their portfolio and manage profitability. In other words, they had to be able to give their distribution force a reason to sell the new products—not just deliver product changes.

This was a twist on the phrase, “If you build it, they will come,” and a reminder to be sure and consider the interplay between separate processes when evaluating investments. In constructing a product administration roadmap, an assessment of incentive management should be made. Incentive system upgrades may be necessary in order to fully benefit from administration enhancements.

This blog has been reprinted with permission from Celent.

Mike Fitzgerald is a senior analyst in Celent's insurance practice, and can be reached at mfitzgerald@celent.com.

Readers are encouraged to respond to Mike using the “Add Your Comments” box below.

The opinions posted in this blog do not necessarily reflect those of Insurance Networking News or SourceMedia.

Comments (0)

Be the first to comment on this post using the section below.

Add Your Comments...

Already Registered?

If you have already registered to Insurance Networking News, please use the form below to login. When completed you will immeditely be directed to post a comment.

Forgot your password?

Not Registered?

You must be registered to post a comment. Click here to register.

Blog Archive

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly Of Enterprise BI

When IT can't deliver, business users build their own applications focusing on agility, flexibility and reaction times.

The IT-Savvy 10%

IBM survey reveals best practices of IT leaders.

The Software-Defined Health Insurer: Radical But Realistic?

Can a tech startup digitally assemble the pieces of a comprehensive, employer-provided health plan?

Data Governance in Insurance Carriers

As the insurance industry moves into a more data-centric world, data governance becomes more critical for ensuring the data is consistent, reliable and usable for analysis.

Fear This

Just days before this Issue, which contains our security cover story, went to press, we got some interesting news: 1.2 billion unique usernames and passwords and 542 million email addresses were reportedly stolen from 420,000 websites, according to The New York Times. The websites ranged from Fortune 500 companies down to small online retailers.

Should You Back Up Enterprise Data to the Cloud?

Six questions that need to be asked before signing on with an outside service.