The Role of the Modern Insurance CIO

Craig Weber
Insurance Experts' Forum, November 19, 2009

I recently spent several days with 60 or so insurance CIOs at a conference. Some observations from that experience that I think are worth sharing:

Most CIOs are excellent, professional data gatherers. They used both formal meetings and informal conversations to gather intelligence, and to share their stories, with the implied understanding that a healthy exchange of ideas could help them do their jobs better.

Some problems that CIOs face are nearly universal, despite differences by company size, culture and line of business distinctions. On the agenda for 2010 and beyond: attracting and retaining skilled workers; improving the relationships between business and IT; solving today’s problems with an eye on tomorrow’s technology; and managing complex portfolios of IT projects so that resources used and the business benefits gained are both optimized.

The business of IT doesn’t take place in a vacuum. Business concerns, legal and legislative issues, and universal human foibles always intrude. That’s why CIOs have to wear so many hats in their day-to-day roles. Depending on the hour, CIOs must think and act like strategy consultants, educators, law enforcement, psychologists, arbitrators, firefighters and techno-geeks. If that all sounds a bit much, I would point out that’s what many CIOs appear to like about their jobs: There’s never a dull moment.

In an industry where consensus is often hard to find, most CIOs seem to think that technology is in a relatively good place right now
. Industry trends toward service-oriented architectures (SOA), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), alternative sourcing strategies, plummeting costs of storage and the improved quality of many packaged solutions may finally give CIOs the game-changing tools they need to help their companies thrive.

Celent’s upcoming 2010 insurance CIO/CTO survey report will explore these and other topics, and I can’t wait to see how the data compare to the anecdotal evidence I gathered at the conference.

This blog has been reprinted with permission from Celent. Craig Weber is SVP of Celent's insurance group, and can be reached at cweber@celent.com.

The opinions posted in this blog do not necessarily reflect those of Insurance Networking News or SourceMedia.

Comments (0)

Be the first to comment on this post using the section below.

Add Your Comments...

Already Registered?

If you have already registered to Insurance Networking News, please use the form below to login. When completed you will immeditely be directed to post a comment.

Forgot your password?

Not Registered?

You must be registered to post a comment. Click here to register.

Blog Archive

Wearables Poised to Reshape Insurer-Insured Relationship

Boosted by the impending release of the Apple Watch, wearable devices have received a fair amount of attention recently – and with good reason. This emergent technology has the potential to alter the way the health insurance industry operates on a fundamental level.

Core Transformation – The Ultimate Balancing Act

The core transformation journey requires companies to shift from reactive to proactive business models, incorporating maturing and emerging technologies, customizing and personalizing products, and accelerating speed to market while providing improved customer service.

Despite Valiant Efforts, Insurers' Consumer Ratings Drop

Insurers also are confronting waves of disruptive changes, including big data analytics, an aging population, ongoing economic uncertainty and the growing frequency and severity of natural disasters, which threaten to challenge and undermine businesses.

Why You Can't Take a Wrecking Ball to Your Legacy System

If you think of enterprises like collections of neighborhoods that need to be nurtured, you quickly see that architecture, not obliteration, is the key.

The Apple Bounce: Are Wearables Truly this Big?

I just don’t believe it; only 720,000 Androidwear watches were sold in 2014. Apple has been amazingly successful in so many markets. Were they always first? No, a lot of products before. Were they always best? Again, no, superior devices have fallen.

Ten Stats About Social, Mobile, Analytics, Big Data, Cloud and Digital

Deployment rates have grown in the year since Novarica’s last study on these topics.